Recent Content

 

[3 Sep 2014 | Comments Off | ]

SEMAT (Software Engineering Method and Theory) is an initiative to reshape software engineering such that software engineering qualifies as a rigorous discipline. SEMAT and Essence are big thinking for software developers.

[28 Aug 2014 | Comments Off | ]

Here is a list of software development related conferences and events on Agile ( Scrum, Lean, Kanban) software testing and software quality, programming (Java, .NET, JavaScript, Ruby, Python, PHP) and databases (NoSQL, MySQL, etc.) that will take place in the coming weeks and that have media partnerships with the Methods & Tools software development magazine.

[26 Aug 2014 | Comments Off | ]

We don’t mean that you should put on your Super Tester cape and go protect the world from bugs. There’s no room for big egos on agile teams. Your teammates share your passion for quality. Focus on the teams goals and do what you can to help everyone do their best work.

[21 Aug 2014 | Comments Off | ]

Here is our monthly selection of interesting knowledge material on programming, software testing and project management.  This month you will find some interesting information and opinions about Agile retrospectives, software architecture, software developer psychology, software testing  in Agile teams, quality code and the (funny) history of programming.

[20 Aug 2014 | Comments Off | ]

TVAgile.com has just passed the mark of the 800 resources available with an Oredev conference presentation that discusses how to foment creative collaboration based on the tenets of improv and open spaces.

[28 Jul 2014 | Comments Off | ]

Here is a list of software development related conferences and events on Agile ( Scrum, Lean, Kanban) software testing and software quality, programming (Java, .NET, JavaScript, Ruby, Python, PHP) and databases (NoSQL, MySQL, etc.) that will take place in the coming weeks and that have media partnerships with the Methods & Tools software development magazine.

[25 Jul 2014 | Comments Off | ]

Research has shown that the presumption of selfishness is true for maybe 30% of most populations; another 50% are reliably unselfish, and the remaining 20% could go either way, depending on the context. If a company presumes that the undecided 20% are selfish, you can bet they will be selfish—it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy.